May 17 2020 • Royal Albert Hall

Set sail on an ocean of science, music, comedy and wonder with an all-star cast.

Due to popular demand we are BACK at the Royal Albert Hall with a brand new event. Our biggest and most spectacular show EVER!

Following the success of 2018’s hugely popular Space Shambles, The Cosmic Shambles Network are excited to announce their return to The Royal Albert Hall in 2020 with a brand new sea themed spectacular which is destined to be their biggest show ever.

On May 17th 2020 The Cosmic Shambles Network and the Royal Albert Hall will take you on a celebratory voyage of discovery into the depths of our blue planet and how we can protect it, with a spectacular new show, Sea Shambles. Anchored by co-host of The Infinite Monkey Cage, Robin Ince with physicist and oceanographer Dr Helen Czerski, naturalist and wildlife presenter Steve Backshall and many very special guests, we’ll be turning the entire main auditorium of the Royal Albert Hall into a virtual underwater playground with everything you’ve come to expect from The Cosmic Shambles Network’s signature variety shows, including special effects, puppetry and so very many lasers.

Join Robin, Helen and Steve as they set sail with an all-star cast of scientists, comedians, performers and musical guests (we’ll reveal some, not all – don’t be greedy – very soon…) for a one night only event you’ll never forget.

Tickets on sale NOW!

As always we want to make these unique events as accessible to as many people as possible and so we’ve made sure there are 100’s of tickets starting at just £10!

As part of the event we will also be once again collecting for The Trussell Trust Food Banks and raising money for selected ocean charities.

STARRING

Robin Ince
Comedian & Writer

 

Dr Helen Czerski
Physicist, Oceanographer & Broadcaster

 

Steve Backshall
Naturalist & Wildlife Presenter

British Sea Power
Rock Band

 

Lemn Sissay
Poet

 

Josie Long
Comedian

AND A WHOLE BOATLOAD MORE TO BE ANNOUNCED (AND NOT ANNOUNCED…)

Some Quotes

“Richard Feynman said that the imagination of nature is far greater than the imagination of humans, and what we see living in the ocean is a wonderful example of the possibilities of evolution in extreme conditions. The delight in a child’s eye when it first sees that blobfish really exist is something to behold, in adults’ eyes too. I am sure I am not the only parent who watched Octonauts with their child and thought, “Hang on a minute, that creature can’t be real” and went straight to the internet to check up on the cookie cutter shark or snot sea cucumber. That we know so far more about our Moon than our what lies in our oceans means they remain a place of wonder and mystery. They also remain a place for alarm as we monitor the damage done by human activity. Like every show I get involved with, our aim will be to surprise and delight, to make us all ponder on what it is to be living on a planet with such vitality and such variety in its forms of life, its shapes and structures, its geology and possibilities. I stand ready to be gobsmacked again.” – Robin Ince

“Earth’s oceans are the heart of our planet, a giant blue fluid engine that drives our weather, produces half of all the oxygen we breathe, feeds us, and has shaped human travel, trade and adventure for centuries.  But life is different below the waves, and the creatures that live there have to thrive in conditions that are fundamentally different from those on land.  If you want to see alien life, you don’t need to wait for a ride to Europa or a far-off exoplanet.  Just hang out underwater on a coral reef at dusk and watch for the fabulous spectacle of an octopus out hunting: an independently evolved intelligence with a strange body shape perfectly suited to its weird world.  I find our oceans endlessly fascinating.  They encompass ten metre waves breaking over the bow of a ship in a force 9 gale, giant underwater waterfalls, the extremes of life on a black smoker and the beauty of the fragile single-celled organisations that form the rainforests of the ocean.  If you want to understand Earth, you have to understand our oceans.” – Helen Czerski

“Our oceans cover the majority of our planet, and yet still feel like an alien world. It’s a place filled with strange wonders, colourful conundrums, and biological marvels. Many of its darkest corners are still secret to us, with many great discoveries still out there. And yet we are in danger of killing our oceans before we even understand them. In the last few months alone I have glided over barren white reefs, bleached by warming waters. And fought to disentangle turtles, seals and seabirds from the cuffs of plastic trash. I’ve seen once-flourishing marine dreams, strip mined of their fish, a bounty reaped without any thought of future harvests. It’s time to stop seeing our seas as a foreign land. They, as much as rainforests, are the lungs of our planet. Protect them and they will rebound. Leave it too late, and we will have eternity to rue our mistakes.” – Steve Backshall 

For press enquiries and interview requests please contact Paul Sullivan PR

Show Credits

Presented by Royal Albert Hall, Trunkman Productions and The Cosmic Shambles Network • Produced, Created and Directed by Trent Burton, Melinda Burton & Robin Ince • PR Paul Sullivan • Production Manager Giles Wakely • Stage Manager Matt Watson •  Production Assistant Jo Gostling  •  Effects Seb Lee-Delisle • RAH Production Team Sam Weatherstone,  Laura Edralin, Amy Church, Rick Burin

Photo Credits
Robin – Steve Best, Helen – Timothy Ginn, Lem – Hamish King, BSP – Rough Trade